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Wednesday, July 22, 2020 | History

3 edition of sporulation of Aspergillus amstelodami in submerged culture. found in the catalog.

sporulation of Aspergillus amstelodami in submerged culture.

J. Rosemary Read

sporulation of Aspergillus amstelodami in submerged culture.

by J. Rosemary Read

  • 112 Want to read
  • 14 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Aspergillus amstelodami,
  • Antibiotics

  • The Physical Object
    Pagination55 l.
    Number of Pages55
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13580075M
    OCLC/WorldCa29154256

    The genus Aspergillus includes several hundred fungus species, including: A. Aspergillus acidus Aspergillus aculeatinus Aspergillus aculeatus Aspergillus amstelodami Aspergillus amyloliquefaciens Aspergillus amylovorus Aspergillus anomalus Aspergillus anthodesmis Aspergillus angustatus. Organisms.—Identification of Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus amstelodami was made by The Swedish Seed Testing Institute, Stockholm, and the Ccntraal-burcau Voor Schimmelcultures, Baarn. The cultivation of the fungi was performed in stationary tissue culture flasks onthe following medium:Bacto Peptone(Difco) %, Yeast Extract (Difco).

    Aspergillus niger USM AI 1 was used throughout this study for the production of cellulase. It was obtained from Industrial Biotechnology Research Laboratory (IBRL) culture collection, USM Penang. It is a local isolate, which was obtained from the Northern Region of Peninsular Malaysia in year Astocksoil culture wassubcultured thrice and the spores from the last used for inoculating the fer-mentation medium. Thespores wereharvested bytwo different techniques. In one, the spores were removed by the suction method of McCallan and Wilcoxon (); in the other, the agar slants were flooded with water and the spores dislodged by gentle.

      The head of spore was spherical while the stem of it had smooth wall (Fig. 3). The structure of the whole spore liked a pie with smooth circle and the diameter of it was about um (Fig. 4). The preliminary results of morphology demonstrate that it belongs to A. tubingensis. The yellow-green colony was marked as colony Y (Fig. 5). This is done by injecting a small dose of aspergillus antigen in your lower arm. In case your body reacts to this, a red bump will form at the exact spot or close to where you were injected. Sputum culture – The doctor or technician may take a sample of saliva and mucus that you cough up from your respiratory tract. He will then dye it and.


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Sporulation of Aspergillus amstelodami in submerged culture by J. Rosemary Read Download PDF EPUB FB2

Submerged sporulation was induced by inoculating cm 3 of the above medium, in a 2 dm 3 shake flask, with spores from a well-sporulated Czapek-Dox agar culture and incubating at 25°C for 7 days. The resulting suspension of spores was then used as a 10% inoculum for a vegetative seed stage in a stirred fermenter, the seed culture.

While sporulation by air-exposed A. nidulans colonies apparently occurs in a medium-independent fashion, there have been many reports describing A. nidulans conidiation in submerged culture under conditions where nutrients are limited or in response to other stresses (96,).Cited by: Shu P, Johnson MJ.

Effect of the Composition of the Sporulation Medium on Citric Acid Production by Aspergillus niger in Submerged Culture. J Bacteriol. Aug; 54 Cited by: Aspergillus (/ ˌ æ s p ər ˈ dʒ ɪ l ə s /) is a genus consisting of a few hundred mould species found in various climates worldwide.

Aspergillus was first catalogued in by the Italian priest and biologist Pier Antonio g the fungi under a microscope, Micheli was reminded of the shape of an aspergillum (holy water sprinkler), from Latin spargere (to sprinkle), and named Class: Eurotiomycetes.

Aspergillus lives in the environment. Aspergillus, the mold (a type of fungus) that causes aspergillosis, is very common both indoors and outdoors, so most people breathe in fungal spores every ’s probably impossible to completely avoid breathing in some Aspergillus spores.

For people with healthy immune systems, breathing in Aspergillus isn’t harmful. a) Growth on tissue culture plates. 1) Pour 50 ml of either potato dextrose agar or Sabourauds dextrose agar into a ml tissue culture plate and leave to set.

2) Place a loop of spores from a stock spore solution into the middle of a culture plate. Incubate at 30 to 37°C for days with periodic checking. Cleistothecium production in Aspergillus chevalieri, A. chevalieri var.

intermedins, A. amstelodami, A. repens, and A. ruber is generally inhibited by osmotic pressures exceeding bar obtained by using glucose, sucrose, potassium chloride or sodium chloride in the basic medium. Conversely, conidial head production is enhanced in A. chevalieri and A. chevalieri var.

intermedius. Aspergillosis is an infection caused by Aspergillus, a common mold (a type of fungus) that lives indoors and people breathe in Aspergillus spores every day without getting sick.

However, people with weakened immune systems or lung diseases are at a higher risk of developing health problems due to types of health problems caused by Aspergillus include allergic.

The yield of most fungi is improved by direct culture of samples on so-called ‘fungal media’. For some fungi, cultures are always or almost always negative on bacterial media, examples beingHistoplasma, Mucorales and Coccidioides spp. The culture of Aspergillus spp.

on bacterial media is ~30% less effective than on fungal media. Three Aspergillus species (A. japonicus A, A. tamarii 3 and Aspergillus sp. GM4) belonging to the culture collection of the Laboratory of Prospection and Genetics of Fungi (Department of Biology, Federal University of Lavras, Lavras, MG, Brazil) were previously selected due to their ability to produce tannase in tannic acid agar.

The effectiveness of neem (Azadiracta indica) oil on the growth, morphology, sporulation, viability of spores, aflatoxin B1 and B2 production by A.

flavus on Yeast Extract-Sucrose medium was determined. Neem oil inhibited the fungal growth (i.e. mycelia dry weight, diameter of colony and growth rate) on solid media at concentrations from to % v/v, although it significantly increased.

Aspergillus spores. Unfortunately, Culturable air samples could help in characterizing most of these moulds if they grow and produce spores in culture. References.

Brian G. Shelton, Kimberly H. Kirkland, W. Dana Flanders, and George K. Morris (). Profiles of Airborne Fungi in Buildings and Outdoor Environments in the United States. Aspergillus penicillioides – (this is the one that’s concerning me) Eurotium (A.) amstelodami – 96 Aureobasidium pullulans – 63 Cladosporium sphaerospermum – 68 Wallemia sebi – Alternaria alternata – 4 Cladosporium cladosporioides I – Cladosporium herbarum – Aspergillus is a saprophytic fungus that helps remove environmental carbon and nitrogen from the earth’s atmosphere.

Aspergillus is most commonly found in the soil around us, where it thrives on naturally occurring organic debris. While Aspergillus predominantly grows underground, its spores propagate rapidly in the air with each fungus capable of producing thousands of conidia.

Aspergillus (Plural Aspergilli) is a genus of fungi that consists of about identified species of mold (mould). Aspergillus can be found in a variety of environments throughout the world given that there growth is largely determined by availability of water.

Take a look. About Us. Eurofins EMLab P&K is the leading commercial IAQ laboratory in North America and specializes in analyzing samples to identify mold, bacteria (including Legionella, E. coli, Endotoxins, etc.), asbestos, and radon. CiteSeerX - Document Details (Isaac Councill, Lee Giles, Pradeep Teregowda): A strain of Aspergillus amstelodami, which antagonized the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, was shown to produce at least two antibiotic substances.

A liquid medium was developed for their production, and cultural and assay procedures were defined. The antibiotics appear to be distinct from previously described. Aspergillus is a type of fungus (a spore-forming mold) commonly found both outdoors and indoors.

It grows on plants, soil, rotting vegetable matter, household dust, building materials, and. In order to find the specific concentration of Aspergillus spps you better culture them in solid medium like YES agar at least for three days at degree C.

And then you can dilute the spore. Pigments and melanins of fungal spores have been investigated for decades, revealing important roles in the survival of the fungus in hostile environments. The key genes and the encoded enzymes for pigment and melanin biosynthesis have recently been found in Ascomycota, including Aspergillus spp.

In Aspergillus terreus, the pigmentation has remained mysterious with only one class of melanin. The mold Aspergillus has close to species and varieties. Aspergillus is widely distributed from the arctic region to the illus species are frequently found in air and concerns indoor air quality the most important species are Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus clavatus, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus versicolor.

Aspergillus niger is the largest fungal producer of organic acids, as it is the commercially preferred route for the production of citric and gluconic acids, in addition to being a popular source.surface culture and in submerged processes (Berry et al., ; Kubicek and Rohr, ; Ward, ). A. niger has some uses as the organism itself, in addition to its products of fermentation.

For example, due to its ease of visualization and resistance to several anti-fungal agents, A. niger is used to test the efficacy of preservative treatments.